Cruel story of Youth (1960) review

Oshima succeeds in dissecting in a very precise way how the Other, an Other marked by patriarchy and capitalism, is able to empty the youthful subject of his ideals and dreams as well as how the rebellious protest of certain youthful subjects is, in many cases, an affirmation of the very dynamic that underpins the functioning of the Other.

Gemini (1999) review

A fabulous and unique romance horror narrative that uncovers the often-forgotten truth that all speaking beings are driven by a desire to be loved/desire to love.

Not Quite Dead Yet (2020) Review

While Not Quite Dead Yet is about the importance of communication and about assuming a desire as subject, Hamasaki’s narrative delivers its message in manner that is, when all is said and done, not alive enough.

Red Post on Escher Street (2020)

Sion Sono does not only offer an eloquent celebration of the beauty of the crazy little thing called desire, but also delivers a truly powerful encouragement for the contemporary subject to unshackle himself from the societal or psychological imposed restrictions and fight for his/her desire.

Mother (2020) review

In a languid but highly transparent way, Ohmori confronts the spectator with the subjective and interpersonal ravage the insatiable desire for love and the need for a proof of the other’s love eventually causes.

Short Movie Time: The Report (2020) [JFFH 2020]

Fukushima’s latest might lack the depth some other short films have, this does not stop his Sci-fi romance music video from being a pleasant narrative that also succeeds in touching the spectator.

Stay (2018) review

A great indie romance film that underlines the very importance for subjects to establish inter-subjective (romantic) relationships.

Sakura (2020) review [Japannual 2020]

“A great narrative that does not only show that family happiness is but a semblance – behind the smiles hides pain and sadness – but also the very fact that the subject can only grasp his present subjective state by narrativizing (and, in many cases idealize) his past.”

The Hardness of Avocado (2019) review [Camera Japan 2020]

Jo Masaya’s anti-romantic narrative does not only show the spectator the need for the subject to question their own subjective position, but also the importance to take the other serious at the level of his/her subjectivity.

The Other Home (2018) review [Camera Japan 2020]

Nishikawa shows, in a heartwarming way, that while there is a need to identify ourselves somewhat with the ideal image of our significant other, such identification should not be at the expense of our subjective position.