Sakura (2020) review [Japannual 2020]

“A great narrative that does not only show that family happiness is but a semblance – behind the smiles hides pain and sadness – but also the very fact that the subject can only grasp his present subjective state by narrativizing (and, in many cases idealize) his past.”

Miyamoto (2019) review [Japannual 2020]

“A gripping and surprisingly moving exploration of how one sometimes needs to perform an act in the real in order to be able to reestablish one’s subject in an imaginary position and reaffirm the symbolic inter-subjective commitment one has made.”

Seven Days War (2019) review [Japannual 2020]

This narrative urges youth to escape the alienating and imprisoning mirror-palace of belonging and repressive ideals, come to terms with oneself as subject, and meet the other beyond the deceptive dimension of similarity at the level of subjective difference.

Take Over Zone (2019) [Camera Japan 2020]

While Yamasaki’s message is clear, the delivery of his positive message of empowerment would have more gripping and emotionally powerful for the spectator if the sound-design were on point.

The Hardness of Avocado (2019) review [Camera Japan 2020]

Jo Masaya’s anti-romantic narrative does not only show the spectator the need for the subject to question their own subjective position, but also the importance to take the other serious at the level of his/her subjectivity.

The Other Home (2018) review [Camera Japan 2020]

Nishikawa shows, in a heartwarming way, that while there is a need to identify ourselves somewhat with the ideal image of our significant other, such identification should not be at the expense of our subjective position.

Be My Baby (2013) review

While the narrative has subtle comical flair, “Be My Baby” does not fail to confront the spectator with the two most important obstacles to romantic happiness: the refusal to take one’s own and the other’s subjective position into account and the unquenchable power of sexual desire.

Understanding ‘Cuties’ from a psychoanalytical perspective

“Even though I stated above that Amy’s identification with the hypersexualized image of femininity needs to be understood as a refusal, I think that it is even more correct to understand her behaviour as an acting-out directed to the Islamic Other.”