Wife of A Spy (2020) review

A tremendous achievement [that succeeds in calling] forth orth certain (indigestible) truths concerning the Japanese imperialistic Other.

Lovers Are Wet (1973) review

“Not only a narrative about the destructiveness of male sexual opportunism, but also (a narrative) [that explores] the irreducible opaqueness of the female subject as such.”

Cruel story of Youth (1960) review

Oshima succeeds in dissecting in a very precise way how the Other, an Other marked by patriarchy and capitalism, is able to empty the youthful subject of his ideals and dreams as well as how the rebellious protest of certain youthful subjects is, in many cases, an affirmation of the very dynamic that underpins the functioning of the Other.

Gushing Prayer: A 15-Year-Old Prostitute (1971) review

“Not only does Adachi frame the societal Other as the cause of the lost state of youth and the youth’s suicidal response, but Adachi also formulates, in a truly confronting way, his hope for this lost youth to find desire in creating a different Other for tomorrow.”

Red Post on Escher Street (2020)

Sion Sono does not only offer an eloquent celebration of the beauty of the crazy little thing called desire, but also delivers a truly powerful encouragement for the contemporary subject to unshackle himself from the societal or psychological imposed restrictions and fight for his/her desire.

One Missed Call (2003) Review

Miike’s horror-narrative provides all the thrills, and tropes for that matter, fans of J-horror have come to expect from the genre.

Japan Cuts 2020: Our recommendations.

“We introduce our recommendations for this year’s Japan Cuts, including Labyrinth of Cinema (2019), Murders of Oiso (2019), Extro (2020), Roar (2019), and Shell and Joint (2019).”