House (1977) Review

“One of the most creative and figurative ghost narratives ever made [that also] turns out to be one of the most pure and disturbing confrontations with the uncanny (…). A classic that will long linger in one’s mind.”

Introduction

When Toho studios asked Nobuhiko Obayashi, an experimental short film director, to come up with a narrative like Jaws, they never imagined that he, inspired by his daughter’s fantasy and fears, and screenwriter Chiho Katsura would craft such a crazy narrative.

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Blind woman’s curse (1970) review

“Pleasure (…) is to be extracted from the visuals (…) so beautifully framed by the cinematography, and from the way Meiko Kaji with her mesmerizing performance synthesizes the narrative’s mix of genres.”

Introduction

The King of Cult: Teruo Ishii. With such a prolific and eclectic career, it is no wonder that Ishii is called this way in Japan. And while his oeuvre is eclectic, a certain attraction to the more darker and the more weirder side of humanity has always guided him. This is for instance apparent in his choice to direct the 8 entries of ‘Joys of Torture’ series (1968–1973), a series investigating torture in Japan in a historical context.

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Graveyard of Honour (2002) review

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“[A fabulous confrontation] with the inherent dimension of the self-destructive pleasure, evoking the effects capitalism have on society as a whole along the way.”

Introduction

Takashi Miike is a director that doesn’t need any introduction. Bursting on the international stage with Audition (1999), his human drama gone wrong, he also delighted or affronted audiences with Ichi the killer (2001) and visitor Q (2001). Violence has always had an important presence in Miike’s oeuvre – consisting now of more than 100 movies – and Graveyard of honour is no different.

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Night of the Felines (1972) Review

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“By exploring the problematic field conditioned by sexuality and money, [the narrative] (…) earns its place as a true classic of the Roman porno genre.”

Introduction

For fans of the Roman Porno genre Tanaka Noboru is definitely not one of the forgotten directors. Actually, with narratives like A Woman Called Sada Abe (1975), Watcher in the Attic (1976) and Woman on the Night Train (1972), many would consider him one of the masters of the genre, a director that fully exploited the social and psychological possibilities of the genre.

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