The Hungry Lion (2017) review

“A confronting narrative (…), [exploring] the power of the imaginary and the destructive effects this imaginary can have on the position of the subject within society (…), that is now needed more than ever. “ Introduction If there is one contemporary Japanese director that is socially engaged, it is Ogata Takaomi. He proved this engagement with…

Outrage Beyond (2012) review

“A tense (…) voyeuristic trip through the private spaces of the gokudōsha that unfortunately is not able to underline the futility of violence in the same palpable way as its predecessor.”

Graveyard of Honour (2002) review

“A fabulous confrontation with the inherent dimension of the self-destructive pleasure, evoking the effects capitalism have on society as a whole along the way.” 

Before We Vanish (2017) review

“Another outstanding achievement; (…) a subdued and at times funny exploration of humanity that subtly shifts into a moving meditation of that irrational little thing called love.”

Tokyo Ghoul (2017) review

“Notwithstanding the failure to turn Kaneki’s coming-to-terms into the moving experience it needs to be (…). The narrative is still one of the better high-budget live-action adaptations to appear in recent years.”

Night of the Felines (1972) Review

“By exploring the problematic field conditioned by sexuality and money, the narrative earned its place as a true classic of the Roman Porno genre.” 

Shinjuku Swan 2 (2017) review

The likability of Gou Ayano as Tatsuhiko still shines, turning the second part of Tatsuhiko’s narrative, despite being thematically different and not being refreshing at all, into an enjoyable narrative to experience.”

The Kirishima thing (2012) review

“A splendid crafted high-school narrative (…) that meticulously (…) investigates the complexity of the high-school social fabric, while confronting the spectator with the necessity and the difficulty to become more true to one’s subject.”

That’s It (2015) review

“An exquisite and highly entertaining marriage between Bloodthirsty Butchers’ punk music and Gakuryu Ishii’s crude and highly mobile cinematography (…) [that] touchingly [touches] upon a very delicate matter: the necessity of a symbolic place.”